FUN FACTS:

  • The steep canyon lands south of College Heights and the SDSU campus but north of the El Cerrito Community restricted development of the canyon until after World War II. Before that it was popular area to ride horses from the local stables east of College Avenue.
  • The Baja Canyon consists of a mix of post war contemporary tracts from very modern to neo-traditional styles.
  • The area along with College Heights was started by Leonard Drogin’s Harmony Homes Company. Drogin took full control of the company in 1954 and developed the Campanile Terrace and College Glen tracts in the canyon.
  • The very Modern Contemporary “box homes” of Leonard Drogin’s College Glen tract on Baja Drive were designed by noted Modernist architects Palmer & Krisel. A more contemporary model designed for Drogin’s Pacifica Tract on Mt. Soledad won national design awards. A few such models are found in nearby College View Estates.
  • By this time Drogin was one of the larger tract developer companies in San Diego opening tracts in La Mesa, Oak Park, Lemon Grove, Chula Vista, Clairemont, Del Cerro, and Soledad Mountain.
  • In the 1960s additional tracts such as J.R. Shattuck’s College Woods at the south and east side end of Campanile Drive and College Valley to the west end of the canyon helped usher in larger 2-story and split level contemporary style ranch homes.
  • The Dass Construction Company, one of the larger San Diego developers of the 1960s, also produced homes on the 4700 block of Campanile Drive and Ashby Street under the name Northcliff Mark II. These are based on their award-winning “Dream Home” models that also can be found in University City.

HISTORICAL SUBDIVISIONS:

MARCELLENA TRACT est. 1896

CAMPANILE TERRACE est. 1955-56

PICARD ESTATES est. 1957

COLLEGE GARDENS est. 1958

COLLEGE GLEN est. 1958-59

COLLEGE WOODS est. 1961

COLLEGE VALLEY est. 1963-69

History content provided by James Newland and may not be copied without his permission. To receive permission, contact us.